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Is this the Future of Tire? Airless i-Flex by Hankook



In the near future, you may not have to worry about getting a flat tire.  Sure, you may still end up damaging the tire in one way or another, but judging by the prototypes that are being developed by the likes of Hankook Tires, the chances are slim to none.

Hankook Tires, based out of South Korea, unveiled the latest incarnation of "non-pneumatic" tire, made almost entirely out of specially developed polyurethane synthetics, using organically connected spokes.  The spongy like construction allows it to flex to absorb shocks instead of the air doing the job in the tires of present time.

Today's common car tires have been improved marginally over the years at a very slow rate compared to most other technologies employed in automobiles.  Now, that's about to change with the next generation tires underway by most major tire manufacturers.  Hankook in particular, wants to be the front runner in the new race as being the rookie to join the pack, relatively speaking.

So what's special about i-Flex? Besides getting rid of air tube, the composite used for the polyurethane is made of 95 percent recyclable material.  That is simply amazing achievement, and become one of the major selling point as well, probably getting a welcome support by government agencies in all countries.

Hankook claims that shock absorbency, fuel consumption and riding noise all improve with i-Flex when compared to a conventional tires.

The production date has not been announced yet, but the experts believe it's only a matter of time.

Hankook is concurrently working on even more advanced airless tire technology named eMembrane that is capable of transforming its shape according to different driving and road conditions.

In the near future, you may not have to worry about getting a flat tire.  Sure, you may still end up damaging the tire in one way or another, but judging by the prototypes that are being developed by the likes of Hankook Tires, the chances are slim to none.

Hankook Tires, based out of South Korea, unveiled the latest incarnation of "non-pneumatic" tire, made almost entirely out of specially developed polyurethane synthetics, using organically connected spokes.  The spongy like construction allows it to flex to absorb shocks instead of the air doing the job in the tires of present time.

Today's common car tires have been improved marginally over the years at a very slow rate compared to most other technologies employed in automobiles.  Now, that's about to change with the next generation tires underway by most major tire manufacturers.  Hankook in particular, wants to be the front runner in the new race as being the rookie to join the pack, relatively speaking.

So what's special about i-Flex? Besides getting rid of air tube, the composite used for the polyurethane is made of 95 percent recyclable material.  That is simply amazing achievement, and become one of the major selling point as well, probably getting a welcome support by government agencies in all countries.

Hankook claims that shock absorbency, fuel consumption and riding noise all improve with i-Flex when compared to a conventional tires.

The production date has not been announced yet, but the experts believe it's only a matter of time.

Hankook is concurrently working on even more advanced airless tire technology named eMembrane that is capable of transforming its shape according to different driving and road conditions.

For instance, when driving at high-speeds, the tire’s tread center extends to generate maximum ground friction through wider ground contact area, aiding grip. Conversely, when driving at low-speeds, the tread is designed to produce minimal road contact area and ground friction, whereby the tire's fuel efficiency is enhanced by reducing rolling resistance.




Is this the Future of Tire? Airless i-Flex by Hankook Reviewed by Blogs on 6:15 PM Rating: 5

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